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Category Archives: arboriculture

Building Our Resources: Strengthening Our Advantage

PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE

Agriculture is the leading industry in California, contributing over $500 billion annually to the state. Among universities that grant undergraduate degrees, the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences at Cal Poly SLO is the fourth largest undergraduate agriculture program in the nation, with more than 3,500 students. It is the largest non land-grant agricultural program in the United States. The College awards an average of 650 baccalaureate degrees each year, nearly half of all baccalaureate agriculture degrees granted in California.

San Luis Obispo

San Luis Obispo, CA

The Department of Horticulture and Crop Science now serves over 300 students annually. Students at Cal Poly SLO come from all over California, with the majority hailing from the Central Coast and Central Valley, followed by the San Francisco Bay and Los Angeles areas. Only seven percent of students attend from outside California.

HCS Vineyards

HCS Vineyards

The future of the agricultural industry rests with the education of Cal Poly SLO’s highly capable students who will provide leadership to one of the world’s most important industries. The challenge is enormous: produce more food for exponentially greater numbers of people on less land with a finite amount of natural resources and do it in an environmentally sensitive manner. Food, water, land, and air are our primary resources, and to use them wisely, we need trained, motivated students eager to tackle these critical issues with energy and intelligence. In addition, the enhancement and management of our personal and community environments with plants is an important issue that helps assure us healthful lives and better quality of living and keeps us in harmony with the natural world around us.

San Luis Obispo, CA

San Luis Obispo, CA

AGRICULTURE’S KEY ROLE AT CAL POLY SLO

The University’s learn-by-doing, hands-on philosophy is reflected in the laboratory-intensive curriculum, focus on undergraduate research, importance of cooperative work experience, and the requirement of a senior project that is applied in nature. Cal Poly SLO is an institution that prides itself on keeping students current with industry trends. Horticulture and Crop Science at Cal Poly SLO have a rich tradition dating to the University’s founding in 1901.

Cut Flower production in Retractable Roof Greenhouse at Horticulture Unit

Cut Flower production in Retractable Roof Greenhouse at Horticulture Unit

In 1901, visitors to San Luis Obispo saw a ranching and farming community of just over 3,000 people. What is now the Cal Poly SLO campus was farmland some distance north of the town, a place where the trustees charged with finding land for the campus were impressed by the oranges picked from the groves of the Dawson Lowe Ranch. From the University’s earliest days, agriculture in the fertile area was a primary emphasis–even in areas where the soil was “inferior”. Trustees saw this as a perfect learning opportunity for students. As the campus grew in acreage, extensive dryland crops, vegetable fields, vineyards, and orchards were added to the site.

Cal Poly SLO Orange Groves on Highland Drive Entrance

Cal Poly SLO Orange Groves on Highland Drive Entrance

The departments evolved with the decades, feeling the pinch of the Great Depression and the extraordinary influx of students as a result of the GI Bill. Before World War II, horticulture facilities included a lab for plant propagation, tool storage for horticulture and grounds departments, housing for two students, a redwood lath house, and a 1,200 square foot glasshouse. The Crops Department had 390 acres under cultivation and an assortment of storage facilities. Only after World War II, was an Ag Building constructed, housing classrooms, offices, and labs. In 1962, the Crops field house (Building 17) was erected and land under cultivation soon increased to 719 acres.

Corn fields with Madonna Mountain in the background

Corn fields with Madonna Mountain in the background

Crops Unit Complex (Building 17) erected in 1962

Crops Unit Complex (Building 17) erected in 1962

Peaches in production at the Crops Unit

Peaches in production at the Crops Unit

The subsequent decade witnessed a building boom on campus. Conceived in the 1960’s, the Leaning Pine Arboretum developed over time into a lush, five-acre showcase for native and mediterranean climate plants. The 1970’s saw an increase of 13,000 square feet of greenhouse space for Ornamental Horticulture and Crops and some new facilities. New classroom and office space was added in 1986, with the construction of the Agriculture Sciences Building (Building 11). The Crops Department was able to add two new labs to their site in the 1990’s to replace the labs lost in prior renovations and construction.

Leaning Pine Arboretum at the Horticulture Unit (Building 48)

Leaning Pine Arboretum at the Horticulture Unit (Building 48)

In 2002, Environmental Horticultural Science (formerly Ornamental Horticulture) and Crop Science merged to strengthen student education across the curriculum and better prepare students to enter the Plant Agriculture Industry. But in recent years, facilities for both departments (most of which date from the late 1960’s and early 1970’s) have fallen short of the kind which today’s students expect and today’s industry requires.

EHS Unit at the top of Via Carta on campus

EHS Unit at the top of Via Carta on campus

In response, the Horticulture and Crop Science Department (HCS) has developed a master plan for comprehensive modernization of the Horticulture and Crop Units: the Sustainable Horticulture and Crop Science Complex. The current 20th century facilities will be revitalized to accommodate new technology and the needs of the 21st century. Already, we can see that this century of agriculture is driven by the need to feed and clothe a growing world population using methods that ensure the continued productivity of our farmland.

Food processing and packaging labs

Food processing and packaging labs

In these new facilities students will experience modern harvesting, post-production care and handling, marketing, and retail. The renovations will allow for meaningful collaborations with industry, preparing agricultural graduates to provide immediate value in the workplace, and renew both the Horticulture and Crop Sciences’ curriculum and faculty.

We were the second greenhouse nursery to grow this new variety of Green Ball Dianthus (aka Trick Carnations) grown at the EHS Unit greenhouses

We were the second greenhouse nursery to grow this new variety of Green Ball Dianthus (aka Trick Carnations) grown at the EHS Unit greenhouses

With your support during this planning process for the Sustainable Horticulture and Crops Complex, you will help develop:

  • More and better-qualified graduates
  • Improved learning facilities
  • Cooperative education programs with industry
  • Opportunities for students to enhance their skills in leadership, management, and communication
  • Programs that rapidly incorporate industry advancements, both in sustainability and technology

OUR FUTURE

Perhaps nowhere else in the world are the educational opportunities are greater for students to see, experience, and learn about the production, handling, utilization, and marketing of ornamental and food plants than in Central California’s Coast and Valley. On the coast, the mediterranean climate and superb growing conditions provide an extraordinary spectrum of ornamental and food plants. Nearby in the Central Valley, agricultural production is California’s breadbasket.

We're located in one of the most fertile areas in California

We’re located in one of the most fertile areas in California

California is also home to some of the largest nurseries, greenhouse operations, and landscape maintenance companies in the United States and ranks second among states in the number of golf courses. California’s horticulture industry is a multibillion dollar business and Cal Poly SLO graduates are in demand by the industry.

Students in the greenhouses at the EHS Unit

Students in the greenhouses at the EHS Unit

Poinsettia Enterprise Project in greenhouses at EHS Unit

Poinsettia Enterprise Project in greenhouses at EHS Unit

As we consider the future of agriculture in California, we have an extraordinary opportunity to plan wisely for a Sustainable Horticulture and Crops Complex, attracting new students to agricultural careers and expanding Cal Poly SLO’s critical role in the industry. Working with other departments across the campus, we will continue to teach our students to be environmentally and politically sensitive to the global forces that are shaping our industry:

  • Competing demand for natural resources
  • Cost structures
  • Infrastructure required to ensure a safe food supply
  • Energy consumption and the impact of alternative sources of energy
  • Shortage of skilled labor
  • International public policy demands

WHAT WE SEE FOR OUR FUTURE OF THE DEPARTMENT’S FACILITIES

Driving north on Highway 1 from the coast, the morros of San Luis Obispo rise from the east as you enter the valley, with Bishop’s Peak dominating the west. The entrance to the university on Santa Rosa is the first impression visitors traveling along Highway 1 have of California Polytechnic State University. Flanked by avocado and citrus groves on the south, and Radio Tower Hill to the north, it is also the first impression of the Horticulture and Crop Science Department. It is an ideal location to showcase Horticulture and Crop Science; planting terraces of water-wise native mediterranean plants on the northern slope, opening up the views to the orchards on the south, and creating immediate opportunities for learning with signage along the walkway leading into the interior of campus.

Bishop's Peak dominates the Cal Poly SLO backdrop

Bishop’s Peak dominates the Cal Poly SLO backdrop

Continuing along Highland Drive, now lined with Italian Cypresses, the groves and buildings of Crops Science are the first teaching facilities visitors encounter. The Crops Unit has 70 acres of productive citrus, avocados, grapes, deciduous orchards, and berries. Now the site is a series of labs and ramshackle structures, but we envision a Farmer’s Market outfitted in the old Crops Field House, moving the Organic Farm to this prime location, as well as a new winery, dormatory for a select few students, and upgraded teaching and office space.

Cal Poly SLO Organic Farm

Cal Poly SLO Organic Farm

Walnut processing lab at the Crops Unit

Walnut processing lab at the Crops Unit

The relocated Organic Farm and new Winery will create innovative educational opportunities and programs that reflect the significance of these components in the crops industry. Largely student managed, the current eleven acre Organic Farm is home to a variety of programs, including Cal Poly SLO’s annual CSA subscription program. Students are involved in composting, natural pest control, native plants, bio-intensive agriculture and permaculture design. Additionally, students volunteer for work activities. But the current site is too close to other campus activities to be a truly successful and public-accessible organic farm.

Crops Unit Vineyards

Crops Unit Vineyards

Students harvesting organically grown vegetables at the new Organic Farm

Students harvesting organically grown vegetables at the new Organic Farm

Cal Poly SLO grown produce from the Organic Farm

Cal Poly SLO grown produce from the Organic Farm

Produce from the Organic Farm and Crops Unit sold at the current Farmer's Market on campus

Produce from the Organic Farm and Crops Unit sold at the current Farmer’s Market on campus

Consumers are driving the demand for more organic and sustainable products. Additionally, there is an increased demand for locally produced products. At the new Farmer’s Market and Organic Farm, a visitor might learn about making honey, bottling wine, fruit and nut processing, enjoy an ice cream cone with Cal Poly SLO’s own ice cream, buy flowers and ornamental nursery plants from the Poly Plant Shop, or learn about organic and sustainable (as well as conventional) farming techniques. Visitors meet Horticulture and Crop Science students working in the shops, the fields or new labs, studying integrated pest management, viticulture, vegetable production or cleaning and storing equipment. A new greenhouse showcases the latest in hydroponic production, demonstrating how the vegetables for sale at the Farmer’s Market can be grown during the colder seasons. Green roofs cover the new buildings, including a dormatory for four students who oversee the site. These green roofs are water-wise, and insulate the buildings as well.

Nursery one-gallon plants for sale at Poly Plant Shop

Nursery one-gallon plants for sale at Poly Plant Shop

Poly Plant Shop student-made bouquets for sale

Poly Plant Shop student-made bouquets for sale

Student-built and maintained Greenwall at the EHS Unit

Student-built and maintained Greenwall at the EHS Unit

Cal Poly SLO Honey for sale

Cal Poly SLO Honey for sale

Fruit and vegetable production fields will be redesigned and relocated to enhance educational and operational efficiencies. New laboratories will incorporate the latest in operational and farm management equipment, particularly related to plant protection and product handling systems. Students have the opportunity to learn cutting-edge techniques in the field through close interaction with instructors. Lab-intensive, hands-on approaches to learning continues to be a top priority for our students.

Students trained how to use farm equipment

Students trained how to use farm equipment

Cut flowers in production in the greenhouses at the EHS Unit

Cut flowers in production in the greenhouses at the EHS Unit

One-gallon nursery plants in full production at the EHS Unit

One-gallon nursery plants in full production at the EHS Unit

Driving east along Highland Drive and going left on Via Carta toward Poly Canyon Village, Cal Poly SLO’s new dormatories housing 2,700 undergraduate students, visitors come to the Horticulture Unit now transformed with new greenhouses, a visitor’s center and up-to-date classrooms, demonstrating the latest in plant production and floriculture techniques in a unique rural-urban landscape. The Amatoscapes at the southern end of the Horticulture Unit invite visitors to the Leaning Pine Arboretum, itself a showcase for water-wise mediterranean plants from Chile, South Africa, Australia, Europe’s Mediterranean Basin, and California natives. Along Drumm Creek, a horse trail borders the demonstration are for native plants where students work on bio-water filtration, propagating native grasses and restoring the creek habitat.

IMG_3482

Poly Canyon Village and Cerro Vista undergraduate dorms

Leaning Pine Arboretum

Leaning Pine Arboretum

The California food, fiber, flower, and forest system continue to change dramatically, being driven by continuing advances in technology, consumer behavior and globalization. The new Horticultural Science Unit will train students about the production, harvesting, handling, and utilization of ornamental horticulture crops in contemporary methods. Out-dated labs and classroom facilities will be modernized and greenhouse structures will be renovated to demonstrate cutting-edge technologies. Turf and arboriculture areas will be augmented with the high-tech equipment required for training students in this lucrative industry. Here too the green roofs and green walls are evident on the new dormatory and Visitor’s Center, underlining Horticulture and Crop Sciences’ commitment to creating sustainable landscapes and a harmonious relationship with our environment.

Arboriculture lab

Arboriculture lab

New student-designed, built, and maintained ampitheater

New student-designed, built, and maintained amphitheater

Beautifully student-grown pansies for color trials

Beautifully student-grown pansies for color trials

California claims the largest urban agriculture industries in the United States–industries such as landscape, nursery, greenhouse products, golf and recreation. The Horticulture Unit at Cal Poly SLO can offer students tremendous diversity of landscape–both natural and urban–to learn an integrated approach to land-use that addresses the optimum stewardship of the land, natural resources, energy and labor, combined with sustainable economic growth and profitability. This is the model that California’s agriculture, floriculture, and resource professionals will follow.

Hydroponic vegetable crops in the new Hydroponic Greenhouse at the Crops Unit

Hydroponic vegetable crops in the new Hydroponic Greenhouse at the Crops Unit

Students installing the next crop of hydroponic vegetables in the Hydroponic Vegetable Production lab

Students installing the next crop of hydroponic vegetables in the Hydroponic Vegetable Production lab

Hydroponically grown Gerbera Daisy cut flowers in the EHS Unit greenhouses

Hydroponically grown Gerbera Daisy cut flowers in the EHS Unit greenhouses

HOW YOU CAN HELP REALIZE OUR DREAMS

The College of Agriculture, Food, and Environmental Sciences strives to be a leader in providing students with real-world skills based on laboratory and field-intensive curricula, contemporary instructional technology, uncommon access to senior faculty in small class settings, and student enterprise projects. We already know the new millennium is different than Cal Poly SLO’s was over 60 years ago. Skills, such as computer literacy and being technically savvy, are mandatory. The days of strictly domestic production are disappearing, and success on the international level will require an understanding of other cultures and fluency in other languages. Technology keeps increasing the rate of change in our world, and our students have to be flexible, agile, and successful communicators.

Student grown succulents

Student grown succulents

Senior projects offer students a unique opportunity to Learn. Do. Lead.

Senior projects offer students a unique opportunity to Learn. Do. Lead.

The opportunities are tremendous on this campus. More than 6,000 acres are allocated for agricultural instruction on the campus at San Luis Obispo. There is rangeland for grazing, and more intensively cultivated parcels are used for orchards, vineyards, fruit and nut crops, vegetable production, field crops, agroforestry, and turf management. Greenhouses, the Leaning Pine Arboretum, as well as facilities for fruit and vegetable processing are available for production and instructional use. But Horticulture and Crop Science has not been truly modernized since the 1970’s, putting Cal Poly out of step with industry standards. While the worldwide demand for trained men and women in plant bio-technology, integrated pest management, precision farming, post-harvest technology, research and development, consulting, and marketing is growing everyday, the Horticulture and Crop Science Department has more or less stood still. In order to give our students the best education that Cal Poly SLO can offer (and attract new and fresh faculty) we must bring our facilities up-to-date.

Cal Poly SLO Compost for sale

Cal Poly SLO Compost for sale

Collecting insects for Biocontrol and Entomology classes

Collecting insects for Biocontrol and Entomology classes

Scouting for pathogens at the Crops Unit

Scouting for pathogens at the Crops Unit

We estimate that we will need to raise $20 million dollars to do everything we see in our future. Our immediate goal is to secure $1 million dollars for design and planning of the Horticulture and Crop Science Units. This would include relocating the Organic Farm, changing the circulation and roadway on the site of the new Sustainable Crops Complex, new landscaping along HIghland Drive, garden design and landscaping for the Environmental Horticulture Center and a new entrance to Cal Poly SLO from Santa Rosa. Your gift is the building block that will allow us to incorporate our vision into the curriculum, secure new students and faculty anticipating the latest technology and techniques at Cal Poly SLO, and retain the “Learn by Doing” hallmark on which Cal Poly SLO has built its reputation.

Cal Poly SLO

Cal Poly SLO

If you would like to help us realize our dream for our new department facilities for our students, you can help by donating to the Horticulture and Crop Science Department. Just make a check out to “Horticulture & Crop Science Department” and send it to:

HCS Department,

1 Grand Ave.,

Cal Poly,

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

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It’s A Real Competition…

Max Sheehan, AEPS student

Max Sheehan, PLANET Competition 2013

Cal Poly 2013 Planet Team

 

The mornings are always early on a PLANET trip. Having to wake up way before the “magic eight hours of sleep checkpoint” becomes commonplace. The first morning started early because of our drive from San Luis Obispo to Los Angeles to catch our flight to Atlanta, Georgia. We then had a two-hour drive to Auburn, Alabama. After the fourteen- hour first day of traveling, we had a whole day to figure out our events and workshops. We took over one of the conference rooms in the hotel and renamed it “Cal Poly Headquarters”. This became our home base for the next four days. We spent many hours studying, conversing, strategizing, eating, and occasionally taking breaks to laugh at Taylor Swift parodies on YouTube. But mostly we were just studying. So what did we do on the trip?

Day 1

Day one consisted of us planning our own schedules, and figuring out where and when we needed to be so that we didn’t miss any of our events or workshops. We got a chance to walk around the campus at Auburn University, and it was quite impressive. The football stadium itself was massive and located right in the heart of the campus. I couldn’t even imagine the 80,000 screaming football fans that it seats, since I was coming from a small football team at Poly.  But, I’m getting side tracked…

We walked the campus, and found buildings and sites where our different events would be held come Friday and Saturday. Then we were treated to a big dinner with Valley Crest Landscapes to introduce us to that famous Southern BBQ. Then we had more studying and went to bed to rest up for the coming days.

Day 2

Day two was the day of workshops. Those of us who had events that required explanations or demonstrations were urged to go to these workshops where you could gain valuable information on your events, and even get a leg up on the competition. I had a few workshops: one for hardscape installation where they demonstrated the proper techniques that they were looking for on our finished product come Saturday. I also attended a workshop for the truck and trailer event where they explained the course and all the penalties. In these workshops, they stressed job safety and how we could prevent injury. Finally, I went to the Tractor Loader Backhoe event workshop where they went over the logistics of the event as well as provided an equipment overview. Again they stressed safety in their talks to ensure that it sunk in and that we all understood the dangers of working the equipment. Almost all of the event sponsors talked about safety being essential in the workplace; whichever workplace that may be. I think that PLANET asks the sponsors to stress safety specifically because it is probably the most important aspect of the landscape industry from a company standpoint. This emphasis is a really good thing to have stressed to the participants because it makes the events safer, and it implants the safety aspect into our daily habits.

After the workshops ended, there was more studying to be had, more great food, as well as a good night sleep. On a side note, if you can’t tell, we eat…A LOT…. These trips usually involve gaining a few pounds due to the delicious food provided by the sponsors. And the fact that we ate AT LEAST three full meals a day, which for me is almost unheard of back home.

Day 3

Day three brought with it the opening ceremonies, which is always a good time. There you got to see all of the other schools participating, as well as a re-cap of the events from the prior year, when Cal Poly placed second. You got to cheer your schools’ anthem, which for us is usually conducted by Mike Magnani about two minutes before it’s our turn. We usually come up with something fun and tribal in nature. Following the opening ceremonies, we were all in “schedule mode” as we attended our half-hour event briefings. The basic point of the briefings was to clarify any questions that anyone had, as well as to go over the rules for each event in specific detail.

After all of the event briefings, some of the event competitions began that very same night. For example, I had my Construction Cost Estimating event competition that Friday night where I thought that I did fairly well. I finished strong with plenty of time left. I ended up placing thirteenth out of around sixty-five students. It was stressful in a room where all you heard was tapping feet and pencils scratching and erasing. Luckily I was allowed to listen to some sweet tunage via the iPod while I was completing the event, so the stress was less than the year before. After completing the event I returned to “Cal Poly HQ” and studied for my events to come on Saturday. Then, of course, bed…

Day 4

Day Four. The Big Day. We woke up early to hit the breakfast bar at the hotel (which was amazing). The morning started strong with some of us starting at 8am with our events. Fortunately I didn’t start with Hardscape installation until 10am. It was a one-hour and fifty-minute event. Which meant it was 110 minutes of adrenaline and stress as Cody “magic fingers” Stewart and I raced to finish our mini hardscape patio. Luckily for us, we had been practicing our strategy for a month ahead of time, so we were pros at this point. As the last minutes wound down, we were scrambling to finish the patio, frantically sweeping and cleaning the area to make it look as good as possible. Finally it was over, and man did it look good… We finished, which is more than most of the teams could say. It was a difficult event to compete in; and even harder to do well in. This year we took tenth out of sixty or more teams. Which for Cody and I was a BIG DEAL! We made Chris Wassenberg (one of our PLANET coaches) proud; or at least his equivalent of that emotion… We can never tell with him!

It was 110 minutes of adrenaline and stress as Cody “magic fingers” Stewart and I raced to finish our mini hardscape patio.

It was 110 minutes of adrenaline and stress as Cody “magic fingers” Stewart and I raced to finish our mini hardscape patio.

Then came lunch, which in the middle of the frantic day was an amazing point of relaxation in between the chaos. All I want to say about lunch is “peanut butter pie”. Following lunch was my next competition with fellow teammate Andy Klittich. It was Wood construction: a high-intensity, saw-buzzing, drill-whirring good time. It, like hardscape installation was a one-hour-fifty-minute event and every minute was go go go! This year, the event sponsor, Stihl, decided that a bench was too Plain Jane, so our task was to build a swing instead. After staring at the plan like it was in Chinese for about ten minutes, we established our plan of attack and started to make headway on our swing. And with fifteen minutes to spare, we finished! We ended up taking second place, which was really exciting! Our swing was professional looking, to say the least. It was a shame we couldn’t bring it home with us!

So pretty, we wanted to take it home with us!

So pretty, we wanted to take it home with us!

Then it was a quick jog to the Truck Trailer Operation, where Andy and I would test our ability to safely load a ride-on mower and drive a large truck/trailer set-up through a ridiculously small course. With a little bit of patience and some great test taking and loading know how, Andy and I took first in the competition.

We had to maneuver through a ridiculously small course

We had to maneuver through a ridiculously small course

Then it was a final jaunt to the Tractor Loader Backhoe competition. This event tested our balance of speed and accuracy with the backhoe teeth as you had to pick up three different sized balls and deposit them into a bucket. Point deductions were easy to accrue, and even though I dropped the smallest ball as I attempted to remove it from its PVC perch, I was still able to win the event based on my overall time.

Tractor Loader Backhoe competition. This event tested our balance of speed and accuracy with the backhoe teeth as you had to pick up three different sized balls and deposit them into a bucket.

Tractor Loader Backhoe competition. This event tested our balance of speed and accuracy with the backhoe teeth as you had to pick up three different sized balls and deposit them into a bucket.

Then in tradition, most of the team gathered to watch the end of the Landscape Installation event, where almost everyone who participated in PLANET cheered their team on. We had a great spot next to Palo Alto Community College out of Texas. They were some really nice people, just like many of the other teams at the competition. After a long day of competition, we all had a great dinner and most of us chose a quick nap session before celebrating with the rest of the team. We worked really hard, and now we finally got to relax, with only the suspense of how we placed weighing on our minds.

Day 5

Day five was an early start, big surprise, because of Closing Ceremonies. Here, everyone gathered again like in the Opening Ceremonies, however we were all just waiting to hear about how we placed. There are a few speakers, and then the results came out. They went event by event, calling the top three teams to the stage to receive prizes from the sponsors. Many of our Cal Poly competitors ended up making the walk to the stage either as an individual, or as a pair. I got to go up three times: twice with Andy, and once by myself. Cal Poly SLO was announced as receiving fourth place overall, however we noticed that the points were off a bit, so we made the call and the correction was made a few weeks later that we had actually received second place overall!

I placed fifth overall student out of 800 students, which is extremely exciting for me as I strived this year for a place in the top 5! After some celebration and photos, we took off for some good ol’ Jimmy John’s Sandwiches. We then raced to Atlanta to catch our flight back to L.A. and then our four-hour drive back up to San Luis. We made it back home around midnight on Sunday after an almost full day of traveling.

This competition has been an incredible experience for me for the last three years. I am extremely sad that I have to let it go next year as I will be graduating in the Fall. The places I have been: Chicago, Kansas, and Alabama, have been great places to visit with amazing people at all of the events too! The stress and anticipation is addicting at times and is something that makes all of us strive to be greater. It’s kind of cool being around so many people from around the nation that have the same interests as you. We all love the industry and want to do our best as we graduate from school and enroll in real life. And as I do just that, I will always remember PLANET, the team mates I have had, the professors that have helped immensely, and the competition itself for being so damn fun. I will definitely take what I have learned and apply it later on as I start my career.

Cal Poly placed Second overall two years in a row!

Cal Poly placed Second overall two years in a row!